The Early Days: Will You Be My Valentine?

Valentines Day 2001, at the Lego station in Ms. Cornelius’ Kindergarten class:

Me: Will you be my Valentine?

(Also on my list of “Valentines” that day: my mom, my neighbor, the class guinea pig.)

Hannah: No. If you’re a girl your Valentine has to be a boy and if you’re a boy it has to be a girl.

Me: Oh. Why?

Hannah: I don’t know, it’s just the rule. That’s what my dad told me.

Me: Oh. Okay.

(Mentally) That’s a weird and confusing rule. Who came up with this stuff? When do we get chocolate?

Coincidentally, I still have those three thoughts pretty frequently now.

good-bye-candy

 

Advertisements

The Art of Over-Interpretation: O Christmas Tree

So we’re listening to Christmas songs, and I’m like:

It has kind of a cruel irony to it, right? Because it seems to be talking about something that’s constant and reliable in an otherwise changing world. But if you think about it, it’s a Christmas tree. It’s probably already been chopped down and it’s gonna get thrown out on the curb some time between February and March. So even though they’re singing about how it will stay green through all the seasons, you know the tree isn’t even gonna last to summer.

It’s like everything is temporary, even the things that have given you the impression of permanence and constancy in the past.

Then again, my Christmas tree is plastic, so . . .

Reality note: turns out (according to Wikipedia, the true source of all knowledge) even though the original song wasn’t about cut Christmas trees (just evergreens), historical interpretations were pretty much just as sad:

“Joachim August Zarnack (de) (1777–1827) in 1819 wrote a tragic love song inspired by this folk song, taking the evergreen, “faithful” fir tree as contrasting with a faithless lover.”

So Merry Christmas people! And/or good luck on your post-Hanukah recovery! And/or Happy Kwanzaa’s Eve! And/or Happy Thursday!

Things I Learned in 2013

  1. College admissions are not controlled by some magical, divine force. No matter what they tell you about ending up where you’re “meant to be,” it’s really just people and numbers on the other side of the process.
  2. That said, most people don’t need a flawlessly-matched college to have a positive experience.
  3. Moving, distance, semi-independent living, urban navigation, and time management are not nearly as hard as people make them out to be.
  4. It’s one thing to hear older artists talk about how they don’t care about success or external validation and like the idea, but it’s another to genuinely feel this way about myself. I need some distance from the constant panic and uncertainty of young adulthood before I can get to that place, and that’s okay.
  5. There is more than one way to be social.
  6. You know how people slightly older than you seem to have it all figured out. They don’t.
  7. Everyone’s life looks way more exciting/perfect on Facebook.
  8. It’s totally okay to feel lots of different things simultaneously. Acknowledging this make every one-word answer to “How are you?” feel painfully dishonest.
  9. Everyone is shamefully ignorant about something. Google helps.
  10. Not all snow is adequate for snowman building.
  11. I don’t actually know what my parents are thinking.
  12. People have no idea what I’m thinking either. Explaining is important.
  13. Java and JavaScript are actually not the same thing.

Image

Have a great new year, people. Or an average one. No pressure.